Adams Sophomores Visit Holocaust Memorial

Some+exhibits+in+the+Holocaust+museum+include+disturbing+images+not+suited+for+young+children%2C+a+disclaimer+voiced+throughout+the+tour

Sophia Williams

Some exhibits in the Holocaust museum include disturbing images not suited for young children, a disclaimer voiced throughout the tour

Sophia Williams, Staff Writer

The Holocaust is an unforgettable and tragic event that is forever burned into history. In total, 11 million people were systematically murdered by the Nazi Party during the Holocaust, and each and every one of them will be remembered forever. A myriad of museums and memorials are dedicated to the harrowing events of the holocaust, and for Mr. Jack Beall’s class, it was time to learn about these atrocities.

On Friday, February 19, Beall took his sophomore U.S. History classes to the Holocaust Memorial Center in Farmington Hills to learn more about the Holocaust and World War II. While the trip was optional, Beall strongly suggested everyone attend. At the center, students were greeted by an actual boxcar which carried Jewish people and others to concentration death camps, where they were killed or worked to death.

As the students walked through the doors, a mutual sobriety fell over the group. Students from Rochester Adams and Rochester High Schools were sorted into groups and sent on tours where they learned about the Jewish religion and accompanying prejudices. They learned about the rise of anti-semitism and the beginning of the Nazi party, including Hitler’s growth in popularity. Nazi flags adorned the hallways, and anti-semitic propaganda created an uncomfortable mood throughout the tour.

One of the most significant segments of the tour was the video room, which was filled with several screens playing horrific images of camps and liberation. The footage of dead bodies  being bulldozed into ditches churned everyone’s stomachs.

Once the tour was over, students were led back into the memorial’s classroom to hear from a holocaust survivor. Paula Marks nee Rajchman shared her story.  She was a mere 13 years old when she was thrown into history. Her full story can be read on the Holocaust Memorial Center’s website.  Needless to say, students left the classroom with tears in their eyes, and hope in their hearts.

Whether visitors are history buffs or not, the Holocaust Memorial Center will impact everyone. The center offers a unique opportunity to gain immense empathy for the victims of the Holocaust, and shows what living against death is really like. The Holocaust Memorial Center exists to teach people these events so that another Holocaust never happens again.